ANSC 520: Classical Dressage Experience in Portugal

INTERESTED IN REGISTERING FOR ANSC520 for Spring 2013? CLICK HERE!  Mandatory Info night on Nov. 6th @5:10pm in the Light Horse Classroom.

ANSC 520 is a 2-credit class offered Spring Semester with a Weekly Seminar: Tuesday, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m., preparing students for 1 Week in Portugal to receive Classical dressage training at L'Escola de Equitação de Alcainça during Spring Break or after commencement


Portugal
Portugal
Portugal
Portugal
Portugal
Portugal
Portugal
Portugal

Concentrated study of the Portuguese method of classical dressage at L'Escola De Equitaco De Alcainca 'N Alainca, Portugal. This class affords students the opportunity to ride at a premiere center for equestrian art with a master of classical dressage and to experience the culture of Portugal. Offers full immersion in dressage riding, teaching, and training. Trip takes place over Spring Break. Weekly seminar held prior to departure. Special fee of $2450. Prereq: ANSC 402: Horsemanship at I-2 level or above and permission required.

Salette Rodrigues and her family established the school of equestrian art, which is dedicated to preserving classical dressage, and the harmony between the Lusitano horse and rider. The head instructor at the school is George Malleroni. He was the apprentice of Nuno Oliveria, a renowned master of Portuguese dressage. At the school, the students experience a level of expert instruction on highly trained horses that cannot be paralleled in the United States. Lessons consist of three students per instructor and students are taught to ride in formation. The instructor demands intense physical and mental focus.

A typical day begins with an early morning breakfast of local cheese, bread and fruit. The students then set off to prepare their horses for their two hour morning lesson. Lunch follows, along with the opportunity to observe the instructors schooling the young horses. The two to three hour afternoon lesson is followed by spare time which is spent writing in journals or exploring the cobbled streets and grassy hills of Alcainca. Students are given the occasional afternoon off to explore remnants of a Moorish castle that dates to the 11th century. The ancient stone walls are set into the mountainside, weaving through the contours of a thriving replica of Germany's Black Forest. From the top, the ruins reveal the terracotta roofs and daily life that is Sintra.

Students also visit the Portuguese National Riding School, located within the palace grounds and gardens of Queluz. At this Portugalprestigious school they maintain the traditional riding techniques of the Portuguese Cavalry and high school movements of classical dressage. These, movements are rarely performed in the United States, due to the intricacy and tact that they demand.

A fundamental principle of non-competitive classical dressage training is. . .

For the rider to enable the horse, so that he can express his natural movements under saddle- Essentially freeing him from human encumbrance.

Each individual student learns refinement, tact and a sensitivity that can only come through the guidance of phenomenal instructors and talented, willing horses.

Portugal